Terms from OOH-RAH!

Our Oohrah! Dramaturg, Kendra Miller, put together an index of terms found in the script that we may be unfamiliar with. Here are a few to check out before heading to the show…

Carowinds
“Last I saw you, you were beggin your Mom for second holes in your ears and crying over trips to Carowinds.” –  Ron

Carowinds is a theme park located adjacent to Interstate 77 on the state line between North and South Carolina, in Charlotte and Fort Mill, built in 1973. Attendance at Carowinds was severely diminished by the 1973 oil crisis, and the park suffered from sagging attendance and mounting debt throughout its history.

Ooh Rah
“Ooh Rah, Devil Dog!” – Ron

Greeting and battle cry used by the United States Marines since the mid-20th century, equivalent to the Army’s “hooah!” Also can refer to a number of different responses, including “heard, understood and acknowledged”, “copy that”, “affirmative”,  and anything and everything except “no”. Also used as call and response, a cheer to boost morale, an adjective describing anything particularly Marine-like. It originated relatively recently, and is more common among post-Vietnam Marines.

Devil Dog
“Ooh Rah, Devil Dog!” – Ron

Devil Dogs: The German Army coined this term of respect for U.S. Marines during World War I. In the summer of 1918 the German Army was driving toward Paris. The French Army was in full retreat. In a desperate effort to save Paris, the newly arrived U.S. Marines were thrown into the breach. In June 1918, in bitter fighting lasting for weeks, Marines repeatedly repulsed the Germans in Belleau Wood. The German drive toward Paris sputtered, fizzled, and died. Then the Marines attacked and swept the Germans back out of Belleau Wood. Paris had been saved. The tide of war had turned. Five months later Germany would be forced to accept an armistice. The battle tenacity and fury of the U.S. Marines had stunned the Germans. In their official reports they called the Marines “teufel hunden,” meaning Devil Dogs, the ferocious mountain dogs of Bavarian folklore.

devil dogging – correcting another Marine’s minor deficiency, often in public with implied humiliation.

Under the Tuscan Sun
“They’re just like the ones they use in Tuscany like in Under the Tuscan Sun. You hold em at the base and swish it around and the wine breathes, cause apparently wine’s gotta breathe too.” – Sara

Under the Tuscan Sun was made in 2003, based on Frances Mayes’ memoir in 1996, directed by Audrey Wells and starring Diane Lane. “A woman starts her life over with a new home in a new land in this romantic comedy drama . Frances (Diane Lane) is a writer in her mid-’30s who feels emotionally derailed after her divorce. Unhappy and unable to write, she isn’t sure what to do with her life, and her best friend Patti (Sandra Oh) decides she needs some time away from her problems. With that in mind, Patti gives Frances a ticket for a two-week tour of the Tuscany region of Italy; while there, Frances finds a dilapidated old villa. Charmed by the warmth, beauty, and charm of the small town of Cortona, Frances impulsively decides to buy the villa, thinking she can fix it up herself. The home proves to be more of a handyman’s special than she imagined, but as she slowly gets the hang of household maintenance, Italian style, Frances develops a new confidence as she makes friends with her neighbors and finds love with a handsome local named Marcello (Raoul Bova). Under the Tuscan Sun is loosely adapted from the memoir by Frances Mayes, who (unlike the leading character of the film) remained happily married during her sojourn in Tuscany. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi

“Huahh!”
Commonly spelled “Hooah!”
“HUAHH, SIR!” – Chip

Greeting and battle cry used by the U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force that can refer to a number of different responses, including “heard, understood and acknowledged”, “copy that”, “affirmative”,  and anything and everything except “no”. Also used as call and response, a cheer to boost morale, an adjective describing anything particularly Army-like. The origin is disputed, with some attributing it to the film The DI, made in 1956, from the command of Sgt Jim Moore – “Let me hear you roar, tigers!”, with “hooah” being  the roared response.

Semper fi
“Semper Fi, right? That’s what you say?” – Ron
“SEMPER FI.” – Chip

Latin for “always loyal”, motto of the United States Marine Corps, shortened from the full Latin: Semper Fidelis. Adopted by the Marine Corps in 1883.

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